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It is not a secret that if you want to master the English language, you have to know a wide range of phrases you can use to express something. The English language has a very developed phraseology. In that sense, I will try to help you learn some very useful phrases for making, accepting and refusing invitations in English so that your English gets even closer to native.
When we make an invitation, we usually ask someone to join us for a particular event such as a meal, a party or some activity. In this lesson, we will be learning useful phrases to help you invite someone for an event or activity, as well as different ways to accept or decline an invitation. 

How to ask people about their arrangements

First of all, we need to ask people about their arrangements to check if they are available. We can do that in the following ways:

  • Are you free on Saturday morning?
  • Are you doing anything tonight?
  • What are you doing after work?
  • Do you have any arrangements for the weekend?
 Making, Accepting and Refusing Invitations
Making, Accepting and Refusing Invitations

How to make an invitation

We can invite people in more or less formal ways depending on who we are inviting and what’s the occasion. But the main phrases to use are these:

Do you want to…?

  • Do you want to join us for a drink after work?
  • Do you want to join us for a game of badminton?

Would you like…?

  • Would you like to come to the concert with us?
  • Would you like to play netball on the beach?

Why don’t you/we…?

  • Why don’t we go for a picnic on Saturday?
  • Why don’t you come with us on a city break to Barcelona?

Let’s…

  • Let’s play tennis on Sunday morning!
  • Let’s throw a party. I’ve graduated!

How about…?

  • How about a cup of coffee?
  • How about going to the pub tonight?

We can use all kinds of different phrases to invite someone, such as:

  • Would you be interested in joining us tomorrow? We’re celebrating my father’s retirement.
  • Do you feel like coming for a meal at our house on Sunday? We’re having some friends around.
  • I invite you to my birthday party on Thursday evening. 
  • I was wondering if you could join us for a game of cards?
  • I’d like to ask you if you could come to my daughter’s wedding next weekend.
  • We would be very pleased if you could join us.
 Making, Accepting and Refusing Invitations
Making, Accepting and Refusing Invitations

How to accept an invitation

It is a good idea to accept the invitation with “thank you”. For example:

  • Thanks, I’d be glad.
  • Thank you, I’d love to.
  • Thank you very much, I would be honoured.

Here are some more phrases for accepting invitations:

  • That sounds great / lovely / super / fun 
  • I’d love to, thanks!
  • It’s very kind of you / You are very kind.
  • Sure, I’d love to.
  • What a great idea. What time?
  • With pleasure!
  • I wouldn’t miss it for the world!

How to refuse an invitation

There are many different ways to refuse an invitation, but try to give a reason for it.

  • Sorry, I can’t. I have some other plans / arrangements.
  • I’m afraid I can’t because I’m looking after my sister’s children.
  • I don’t want to sound rude but my parents are visiting me on Saturday.
  • I’d love to but I’m really busy.
  • Thanks for your invitation but I have to study for the test.
  • Maybe some other time.
  Making, Accepting and Refusing Invitations
Making, Accepting and Refusing Invitations

Here are some conversation examples:

I

A: Are you free on Sunday afternoon?

B: Yes, I am. Why do you ask?

A: Well, my husband and I are having some friends around for lunch. Would you like to come?

B: Yes, sure. I’d love to. What time?

A: 2 pm.

B: Should I take something?

B: No, thanks, that won’t be necessary.

II

A: Do you have any arrangements for the weekend?

B: Well, I’m writing a report for work.

A: I was wondering if you could come to London with us. 

B: I’d love to but I’m really busy. Thanks anyway. Maybe some other time.

How to write an invitation

Don’t forget that you can make invitations in written form as well. In that case, your letter (or an email) can be more or less formal depending on who you are writing to, and you can use the following phrases:

  • I’m writing to invite you…
  • We are organizing a party, and we would love it if you could come…
  • We would be honoured if you could join us…
  • You are invited to attend / we invite you…

If you liked this post, check out our other posts:

Asking for and Giving Permission

Asking for, Giving and Responding to Advice

How to Ask for Clarification in English

Making, Accepting, and Rejecting Suggestions

Ways to Complain in English

How to Express Your Opinion in English

Polite Requests in English

Making, Accepting and Refusing Invitations

If you really want to learn English but don’t know how to do it and where to start, don’t hesitate to contact us. Book an online English lesson with one of our certified and experienced English teachers and take a test and consultation. Choose the most suitable app: Skype, Zoom, WhatsApp, Viber or Facebook Messenger. You should certainly join us for 30-minute conversation sessions. We are organizing lessons at a 30% discount. Check it out!

In case you have any questions regarding English or Skype private lessons, don’t hesitate to drop us a line on WhatsApp because we’d be happy to hear from you. 🙂


My Lingua Academy

My Lingua Academy is an online school of English language. We give one-on-one lessons to students of English of all ages and all levels of knowledge all around the world. With us you can prepare for written assignments and exams, attend a general or business English course, or have conversation classes with qualified English teachers who have years of experience.

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Making, Accepting, and Rejecting Suggestions - My Lingua Academy · 18 Jan 2022 at 11:26 pm

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