Be Used to & Get Used to

Many people get confused over “be used to” and “get used to”. They don’t know when to use which construction. Well, here is the explanation

Phrasal Verbs Related to Thinking

Although not suitable for formal context, phrasal verbs are essential in spoken English. Here are 12 phrasal verbs related to thinking

How to Use WOULD in English

Would is a modal and auxiliary verb and the past form of "will". We can use it in several ways in English

19 Expressions with “Touch” You Should Know

Are you superstitious? 🙂 Do you ever touch wood when you don't want something bad to happen to you? As a matter of fact, this custom originates from the distant past when people believed that fairies, ghosts and spirits lived in trees. Can you believe it? 🙂 In today's lesson, we will be learning some expressions with "touch".

9 Expressions with the Word “Big”

Here are some expressions with the word "big" to make you sound smarter: big brother, big decision, big deal, ...

10 Expressions with “Imagine”

The verb "imagine" means to form mental pictures or ideas in your head. It is widely used in the English language to build various phrases and expressions. Here are some commonly used ones

The First Conditional

We use the first conditional to talk about real or possible future situations, to make predictions, offers, suggestions, etc. Learn about the first conditional sentences and do the quiz

Difference between “Above” and “Over”

Both "over" and "above" mean 'higher than' and in many cases are interchangeable. But there are some differences between them.

10 Expressions about Success

Here are some useful expressions about success to help you on your English learning journey

Other Ways to Say “Fit” (Synonyms)

The adjective "fit" has more than one meaning but in this lesson, we will discuss its meaning as "be in good physical condition", which is related to "fitness".

MADE OF / FROM / OUT OF / WITH

Sometimes, it can be pretty hard to tell whether something is "made from" or "made of" or even "made out from". Let's look at the explanation

21+ Expressions with “Way”

Have you ever lost your way in a new place or learn something the hard way? Here are 21 everyday expressions with “way” you may find useful.

Things Happening One After Another

Improve and enrich your vocabulary. Learn five different ways to describe actions happening one after another

Collocations with the Word “Habit”

Collocations are groups of words that naturally go together. To sound natural, you need to know collocations. In today's lesson, you will learn a few commonly used expressions which collocate with the word "habit"In today's lesson, you will find a few commonly used expressions which collocate with the word "habit"

Collocations about Newspaper

Here are some common expressions related to newspaper

Arrive in or Arrive at?

It is not always clear whether to say "arrive in" or "arrive at" although it is not too complicated. Here is the explanation

9 Phrasal Verbs with “Up”

Here are 9 easy commonly used phrasal verbs with "up" you must know

10 Expressions with “Money”

Here are some word combinations with the noun "money" that often go together

Phrasal Verb “Make up”

Phrasal verbs tend to have more than one meaning. The phrasal verb "make up" is definitely one of them. Here are four meanings of this phrasal verbs you can easily adopt.

Holiday Collocations

Whether you're going to the seaside, lakes or mountains, or have some other plans, I'm sure it'll be useful to look at these holiday collocations:

Ways to Use Can and Could

'Can' and 'could' are modal verbs used in a few different ways.

Phrasal Verb: Pick Up

As a rule, phrasal verbs usually have more than one meaning. Let's look at the meanings of the phrasal verb "pick up":

Will and Would

In case you have any doubts or insecurities about using 'will' and 'would', then this post is for you.

Other Ways to Say ‘Useful’

Here is a great opportunity to enrich your vocabulary. Learn different ways to say "useful".

Ways to Complain

Here are some useful phrases to help you when complaining: I'm afraid I have a complaint about... I have a complaint to make... There seems to be a problem / something wrong with... Look, I'm sorry to bother you, but... Sorry to bother you, but I wish to complain about... I would be very grateful … Continue reading Ways to Complain

Idioms with the Noun ‘Story’

Enrich your vocabulary with these 5 interesting expressions with the noun "story". There may be similar expressions in your language,

Other Ways to Say ‘Angry’

Are you feeling mad sometimes? Or maybe irritated while waiting in a queue? In this lesson, you will find different ways to describe these emotions.

23 Ways to Use the Verb “Meet”

In order to learn the language properly, we need to know expressions such as collocations, phrasal verbs, idiomatic expressions, etc. Here is a great way for you to improve and enrich your vocabulary. Meet the verb “meet”!

Phrasal verb: Work Out

Like many others, phrasal verb 'work out' has more than one meaning. Let's look at a few of them: Work out 1 Meaning: to think of a solution for dealing with a problem. Ex: We have to work out a way to fit this shelf here. Environmentalists are trying to work out a solution for … Continue reading Phrasal verb: Work Out

Commonly Mistaken Words: Taste and Flavour

Words "taste" and "flavour" are not interchangeable, as many may think, and we use them differently. The word TASTE refers to flavours we can feel with our senses: salty, sour, sweet or bitter. The word FLAVOUR refers to the quality of something which affects the sense of taste. Taste and flavour are both verbs and … Continue reading Commonly Mistaken Words: Taste and Flavour

Phrasal Verbs with “Hand”

Have your grandparents ever handed down something to you? Learn what it means here. Here are four phrasal verbs with the word "hand"

11 Phrasal Verbs with Around

Are you struggling to remember phrasal verbs? 🙂 Then this is the right post for you. Here are 11 phrasal verbs with 'around' that may come handy any time:

Borrow vs Lend

“Borrow” and “lend” often confuse English students. Even some native speakers make mistakes with these 2 words! Both words describe the action of somebody temporarily giving something to somebody else.

Farther vs Further

Farther and Further are mostly interchangeable, but there is a major difference between them.

Collocations with ‘Age’

Collocations are natural expressions and as such they are essential when learning a language. Here are some typical collocations with the word 'age': For ages - for a long time Ex: It took us ages to get out of the traffic! Look (one's) age - appear as old as you are. Ex: You don't look … Continue reading Collocations with ‘Age’

8 Ways to Say “Interesting”

There are numerous words and phrases we can use to express our interest in something. Here are eight synonyms you can use instead of the word "interesting" in your speech and writing. ENGAGING If, for example, someone's smile is engaging, it means that it is pleasant and charming.Ex: Tom was the most engaging storyteller I've … Continue reading 8 Ways to Say “Interesting”

Prepositions of Place

Here are some commonly used prepositions of place with example sentences

Collocations with ‘Move’

Here are some useful expressions with the word 'move' which can help your English sound more eloquent and natural: Good/bad/important/smart/clever move One smart move could stop the war. Make a move Judith couldn’t make a move when the lights went out. Move back to Move back to the old lifestyle. Move away from Move away … Continue reading Collocations with ‘Move’

Expressions with “Say”

Here are some collocation with "say" to help your English sound more natural. Have something/nothing to say Carla had nothing to say regarding the missing things. Want/long to say I want to say the truth! Suffice (it) to say Suffice it to say, I invested much into that business. Dare (not) say I dare not … Continue reading Expressions with “Say”

6 Phrasal Verbs with ‘Come’ You Probably Don’t Know

In today's lesson, we will be learning some everyday phrasal verbs with the verb "come" which you should try to memorize and use by all means. Come across – meet someone accidentally. Ex: I came across Martha at the meeting yesterday. Come down with – start being ill. Ex: I’m afraid I can’t go out … Continue reading 6 Phrasal Verbs with ‘Come’ You Probably Don’t Know

20+ Expressions with the Verb ‘Give’

When you learn a language, you should try to memorize collocations, phrasal verbs, idioms and other important phrases and expressions, because they make the essence of a language. In that sense, here are 20+ natural expressions using the verb “give”

8 Phrasal Verbs with ‘Over’

In todays lesson, you will learn 8 must-know phrasal verbs with "over"

Expressions with ‘High’

In this lesson, you can learn expressions with the adjective 'high' applicable in everyday situations and add them to your vocabulary.

24 Expressions with the Verb ‘Hold’ + 6 Phrasal Verbs

In this lesson, you'll find 24 Expressions with the Verb 'Hold' + 6 Phrasal Verbs

8 ‘Cat’ Idioms

If you love cats as much as I do, then you might be interested in learning these ‘CAT’ idioms: When the cat’s away, the mice will play – to describe what happens when the teacher leaves the classroom/when your boss is away.Ex: They shouldn’t be so loud, but the teacher left the classroom, and when … Continue reading 8 ‘Cat’ Idioms

Ways to Answer the Question ‘What Do You Do?’

The question "What do you do?" is used to ask about a person's occupation. You should distinguish it from "What are you doing?" as it refers to your current activity.

PEACE expressions

Here are some expressions related to peace which can help you be more eloquent and sound more natural when speaking English Bring about peace - to cause peace to happen.The most efficient way to bring about peace in the country is to negotiate. Hold/keep one's peace - unwilling to talk about something.Many people had witnessed … Continue reading PEACE expressions

Collocations about TRAFFIC

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Phrasal verbs: CALL

Here is a great opportunity to learn five phrasal verbs with "call"

Prepositions of TIME – IN, ON, AT

We normally use: IN for MONTHS, YEARS, SEASONS, DECADES, and CENTURIES ON for DAYS and DATES AT for a SPECIFIC TIME

Indefinite Pronouns

Indefinite pronouns are: anyone, anything, anybody, anywhere, someone, something, somebody, somewhere, no one, nothing, nobody, nowhere. Indefinite pronouns do not refer to any specific person, thing, place or amount.  We normally use –one, -body, -thing, -where to refer to people, things or places in a general way: Anyone could steal your purse. Someone is knocking … Continue reading Indefinite Pronouns

Comparison of Adjectives with as … as, not as … as, etc.

As…as We use as + adjective + as to make comparisons between the things which are equal: Sarah is as pretty as her sister. You have to pack it as carefully as you can. It’s fragile. We worked as hard as we could. Not as … as We use not as … as to make … Continue reading Comparison of Adjectives with as … as, not as … as, etc.

25 Collocations that Describe Someone’s Personality

Do you have a tendency to exaggerate or are you brutally honest? 😐 Learn the meanings of 25 expressions which describe personality

Zero Conditional

Conditional sentences consist of two or more clauses. One of the clauses is the "if clause" and the other is the "main clause". In the real or zero conditional, both if clause and the main clause are usually in the Present Simple Tense.

10 Time off Expressions

Here are some time off expressions which can come handy at work as well as in your daily communication in English and better understanding. To take time off  To be absent from work, at home, or on vacation.Ex: I’m going to take a few days off to visit my parents. To take a vacation  To … Continue reading 10 Time off Expressions

10 Expressions with “Mind”

Here are 10 expressions with "mind" you must know

Relative Pronouns

Most commonly used relative pronouns are who, which, that, whose, when and where. We normally use who for people and some pet animals and which for things. We can use that instead of who or which. The woman who (that) gave me the letter. She gave me the letter which (that) was red. This is the computer which (that) costs a lot of money. Is this the person … Continue reading Relative Pronouns

6 Phrasal Verbs with ‘Ask’

In this lesson, you will have an opportunity to learn six phrasal verbs with 'ask': ASK FOR – to request to see or speak to someone. Bob asked for you while you were at work. ASK AFTER SOMEBODY – ask about someone’s health. Milly asked after your dad. ASK AROUND – to ask different people … Continue reading 6 Phrasal Verbs with ‘Ask’

How to Use “So” and “Such” Correctly

In today’s post, I will try to explain the difference between “so” and “such”. “So” and “such” both mean “very”. They are used to strengthen the meaning of adjectives.

Collocations about BOOKS

Be absorbed in a book - be totally focused on reading. Ex: Derek didn’t hear me because he was absorbed in a book. Bedtime reading - reading in bed. Ex: Would you recommend horror stories for bedtime reading? Compulsive reading - so interesting that you can’t stop reading. Ex: More and more people are indulging … Continue reading Collocations about BOOKS

Order of Adverbs

An adverb is a word that gives more information about a verb, an adjective, another adverb, or even an entire sentence. It can be one word or an adverbial phrase. But, how much do you know about order of adverbs in a sentence?

Collocations with the Word “Hope”

Here are some collocations with the word "hope" to help you adopt natural English expressions as well as build up your vocabulary: Real / sincere hope It is my sincere hope their marriage will be a happy one. High hopes High hopes of his parents were not realized. False hope Don't give him false hope. … Continue reading Collocations with the Word “Hope”

GET vs TAKE

English learners sometimes get confused about the usage of these two verbs because it's not always easy to decide which one to use. Therefore, we need to be very careful when we use them. We can say that take means to hold or pick something, while get has meanings: obtain, reach, arrive. Besides, both verbs … Continue reading GET vs TAKE

Prepositions of Place – AT, IN, ON

There is a lot of confusion about the prepositions AT, IN, ON related to place. The prepositions IN, ON, AT can be used to locate something. Here are some explanations altogether with example sentences. AT AT is used to describe the position of something at a particular place. Examples: at the bus (railway) station, airport … Continue reading Prepositions of Place – AT, IN, ON

Compound Adjectives with -ED Endings

Compound adjectives are adjectives with two or more words and a hyphen between them.

We form them by combining an adjective or number with a noun plus -ED.

9 phrasal verbs with the verb “draw”

Here is a good opportunity to learn some phrasal verbs with the verb "draw"

Word building: suffix -OUS

When we add the suffix -OUS to the nouns, they become adjectives. The suffix -OUS means "full of" or "having the quality of". Let's look at some commonly used adjectives ending in -OUS: ENVIOUS - wanting something that another person has. Ex: You shouldn't be envious of people who have more than you do. DANGEROUS … Continue reading Word building: suffix -OUS

Adjectives with the suffix -ABLE

The suffix -able can be added to verbs to form adjectives that mean 'capable of' or 'suitable for'. Here are some examples of the adjectives with the suffix -able: CAPABLE - having the ability to do something. Ex: I am capable of typing very fast. AFFORDABLE - cheap enough. Ex: These holiday arrangements are affordable. … Continue reading Adjectives with the suffix -ABLE

15 Phrasal Verbs Related to Travel

This post looks at the phrasal verbs used to talk about things when travelling. Here are 15 travel phrasal verbs you should know.

Reflexive Pronouns

In today's lesson, we will be talking about reflexive pronouns. The reflexive pronouns are: Singular: myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself Plural: ourselves, yourselves, themselves

7 Tips to Help You Improve Your Listening Skills

It can be pretty hard to take notes when the teacher is speaking English in ‘light’ speed, watch a film without subtitles or even listen to a podcast. You may find yourself struggling to concentrate or getting nervous because it’s ‘too fast’. It’s frustrating. You've been studying English for so long and you still have … Continue reading 7 Tips to Help You Improve Your Listening Skills

28+ Expressions with “Change”

Here are 28+ commonly used expressions with "change" you might use to make your English sound more natural. I'm sure you'll like some of them as well as use them frequently.

Any Longer vs Any More vs No Longer

Any longer and any more (or anymore) are synonyms. Unlike any longer and any more, no longer is used in positive sentences because it makes the sentence negative.

Also, as well or too?

Also, as well and too are adverbs that have a similar meaning but they do not go in the same position in a sentence.

Expressions with “Keep”

"Keep" is one of the most common verbs in English, and it forms lots of phrasal verbs, collocations and idioms. Here are some of them to help you express yourselves more naturally

Personal and Impersonal Passive

Here is an overview of personal and impersonal passive constructions in English

Punctuation

The word punctuation comes from a Latin word meaning “inserting pauses in writing.” Here are an overview and usage guide for the punctuation in English

How to Express Your Opinion in English

When we give our opinion, we say what we think about something. We can express our opinion in many different ways, but we should take care of the way we’re expressing it. The thing is that we should try not to be too direct as it may be contradictory to someone else’s opinion

How to Make Polite Requests in English

We make requests when we ask someone to do something for us. Therefore, we should be polite and try not to be too direct. For example, we shouldn’t say: “Lend me your car for the weekend” because the person we’re asking for a favour will most probably not lend us the car because we sound rude.   

Mistaken Words Like and As

There is a lot of confusion about these two words because they are similar in meaning. Here are some important differences between them:

Collocations about Physical Appearance

If we want to speak a foreign language properly, we need to learn the words that ‘collocate’ (go together) to sound natural. Here are some commonly used collocations about physical appearance:

46+ Phrasal Verbs with ‘Go’

Many verbs make phrasal verbs. One of the most common ones is the verb “go”. Here are 46+ phrasal verbs with “go” you should try to learn in context and incorporate into your everyday speech.

Words Related to Work

In this post, we are going to focus on vocabulary related to work in English so that you can get a greater knowledge of this specific vocabulary. Below are some words that you may come across when searching for a job or on the job altogether with example sentences

4 Tips to Stop Translating in Your Head and Start Thinking in English

If you are a foreign language learner, then you probably often find yourself translating words and sentences from your native language to the language you’re learning or vice versa.  As a matter of fact, it is a natural thing to do. Yet, you could add to your fluency if you stopped doing it.   Here … Continue reading 4 Tips to Stop Translating in Your Head and Start Thinking in English

Expressions with ‘SAVE’

Here are some common English expressions which could be useful in many different situations: Save a bundle – save a lot of money.Ex: I saved a bundle by buying things on sales. Save one’s breath – it’s no use talking to someone if they’re not listening.Ex: Save your breath! They can’t hear you because of … Continue reading Expressions with ‘SAVE’

Good & Well

The main difference between good and well is good is an adjective and well is an adverb. Things become confusing after linking verbs; we use good after linking verbs such as be, taste, sound, smell, look, seem and feel if we want to describe the subject, not the action of the verb

How to Write a Formal Letter

A formal letter is a letter written to someone you do not know, therefore you should generally use more formal language than in letters you write to your family or friends, avoid phrasal verbs and involve more complex sentence structure

How to Express Wishes and Regrets in English

We use "wish" and "if only" to express regret about situations in the present, future and past which are impossible to happen.

Much, many, a lot of (lots of)

Much, many, and a lot of (lots of) are quantifiers. We use them to talk about large amounts; we don’t know the exact amount. We usually use much and many in negative sentences and questions: + UNCOUNTABLE  NOUN    We haven’t got much water. Is there much sand on the beach? + COUNTABLE  NOUN          There aren’t many … Continue reading Much, many, a lot of (lots of)

8 Idioms Using Animals

The English language has a very developed phraseology. Idioms make a great part of it. Here are 8 idioms using animals which are impossible to be understood unless you know their meaning.