fbpx
negative prefixes and suffixes in English

Negative Prefixes and Suffixes in English

Hi dear English learners! In today’s lesson, we’re going to look at negative prefixes and suffixes in English. I’m sure that you’re sometimes confused and can’t tell if somebody is impolite or unpolite, but don’t worry, you’re not the only one. So, let’s get started with the lesson and hope it will help you clear up some things related to this particular subject.

Double Comparatives

Double Comparatives

I’m sure you know what double comparatives are and you see or hear this kind of expression all the time but you just don’t recognize them by the name. It’s very simple and easy to learn the structure so I’ll teach you so you can enjoy using them as if you were a native speaker.
So-called double comparatives are structures that employ two parallel clauses to express cause and effect.

Gradable and Non-gradable Adjectives

Gradable and Non-gradable Adjectives

Imagine that you saw a film which made a great impression on you. You want to tell your friend about it. Well, you can say it using gradable adjectives – The film I watched last night was interesting or very interesting. But it is hardly enough to describe your impression. You can use the superlative – The film I saw last night was the most interesting film I’ve ever seen. Now you are getting closer. However, the best description would be provided by a non-gradable adjective. – The film I saw last night was fascinating. And can you imagine that you can make it sound even better? Try to strengthen the adjective fascinating with an adverb and your final sentence should sound like this – The film I saw last night was absolutely fascinating. There, you managed to explain the impression the film made on you in a few words by using a non-gradable adjective.

%d bloggers like this: