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12 Idioms Related to Nature

Hi dear English learners! Do you know anyone who’s good-natured? Or do you think it’s a good idea to nip something in the bud? In case you don’t know what these expressions mean, keep reading as I’m about to explain 12 idioms related to nature.

The idioms are as follows:

  • Second nature
  • As fresh as a daisy
  • Good-natured
  • Out of the woods
  • The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence
  • Nip something in the bud
  • A late bloomer
  • Have a green thumb
  • Beat about (around) the bush
  • A shrinking violet
  • Make hay while the sun shines
  • Down to earth
  • Let the grass grow under your feet

12 idioms related to nature

Second nature

Meaning: to be familiar with something so much that you can do it without any effort.

  • Nate has been driving for so long that it is second nature to him now.
  • If you want to be fluent in English, you have to read, listen and speak until it becomes second nature to you.

As fresh as a daisy

Meaning: to be healthy and full of energy.

  • Mark had a nap after work so he felt as fresh as a daisy when he arrived at the party.
  • If you go to bed now you’ll be as fresh as a daisy in the morning.

12 idioms related to nature

Good-natured

Meaning: friendly, kind and pleasant.

  • Mary’s husband is a good-natured, easy-going man. They are very pleasant to be with.
  • Since Sean was a  good-natured person, children usually trusted him and felt free in his presence.

Out of the woods

Meaning: out of danger or difficulty.

  • We signed the contract for selling this product abroad for another year, so we’re out of the woods for the time being.
  • The company has to continue implementing the new plan as we are not out of the woods yet.

12 idioms related to nature

The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence

Meaning: used to say that what other people have seems better than what you have.

  • “Don’t you think they have a great life? They have a beautiful big house, nice children, lots of money…”: “Well, the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. They must have some problems we don’t know anything about.”
  • Sometimes I think that any other job would be better than this one. But then I think – the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. Who knows what problems I’d have there.

Nip something in the bud

Meaning: to end something before it has a chance to make a serious problem.

  • Bad habits in children should be nipped in the bud while they’re still young.
  • In many cases, cancer can be nipped in the bud if noticed in the early stage.

12 idioms related to nature

A late bloomer

Meaning: a person who becomes good at something later than others.

  • Martin was a late bloomer when it comes to reading. He began to enjoy it in his twenties.
  • It took him a long time, but he finally realised what he wanted to do in life. He was a late bloomer.

Have a green thumb

Meaning: be able to make plants grow well and be healthy; be a skilled gardener.

  • Paula has got a green thumb. You should see her beautiful garden.
  • Everybody says my plants are so healthy and lovely because I have a green thumb.

12 idioms related to nature

Beat about (around) the bush

Meaning: to talk about something indirectly, and avoid getting to the point.

  • Will you stop beating about the bush and tell me directly what is going on?
  • Instead of beating around the bush just tell me what you think about our offer. Will you accept it?

A shrinking violet

Meaning: a very shy person.

  • Mary was a shrinking violet before she went to college.
  • When it comes to complaining, Karen was not a shrinking violet.

12 idioms related to nature

Make hay while the sun shines

Meaning: to make the most of a favourable opportunity.

  • All employees will be attending the meeting so why don’t we make hay while the sun shines and make a survey about their training?
  • Prices of real estate will never be better, so make hay while the sun shines and go and see your real estate manager today.

Down to earth

Meaning: used to describe a person as sensible.

  • I really like working with Michael because he is a kind, down to earth person.
  • Tara has always been down to earth and practical person with a great sense of humour.

12 idioms related to nature

Don’t let the grass grow under your feet (AmE)

Meaning: to keep being active.

  • Let’s go back to work. Don’t let the grass grow under your feet.
  • Our neighbour is always doing something. He doesn’t let the grass grow under his feet.

To sum up, here are the idioms related to nature we’ve been through today:

  • Second nature
  • As fresh as a daisy
  • Good-natured
  • Out of the woods
  • The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence
  • Nip something in the bud
  • A late bloomer
  • Have a green thumb
  • Beat about (around) the bush
  • A shrinking violet
  • Make hay while the sun shines
  • Down to earth
  • Let the grass grow under your feet
12 Idioms Related to Nature
12 Idioms Related to Nature

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