Difference between “Above” and “Over”

Both "over" and "above" mean 'higher than' and in many cases are interchangeable. But there are some differences between them.

At the End or In the End?

There is a lot of confusion over the phrases "at the end" and "in the end". How many times have you thought "I'll never learn when to use which one." Here is a simple explanation to guide you.

Arrive in or Arrive at?

It is not always clear whether to say "arrive in" or "arrive at" although it is not too complicated. Here is the explanation

Mistaken words: Sex & Gender

There is a lot of fuss over these two words. Some think they are interchangeable, but the fact is that there is a big difference between them. The word ‘sex’ refers to biological aspects, for example: What is the sex of the baby? It is easy to tell the sex of bees. However, the word … Continue reading Mistaken words: Sex & Gender

Commonly Mistaken Words: Taste and Flavour

Words "taste" and "flavour" are not interchangeable, as many may think, and we use them differently. The word TASTE refers to flavours we can feel with our senses: salty, sour, sweet or bitter. The word FLAVOUR refers to the quality of something which affects the sense of taste. Taste and flavour are both verbs and … Continue reading Commonly Mistaken Words: Taste and Flavour

Borrow vs Lend

“Borrow” and “lend” often confuse English students. Even some native speakers make mistakes with these 2 words! Both words describe the action of somebody temporarily giving something to somebody else.

Farther vs Further

Farther and Further are mostly interchangeable, but there is a major difference between them. We use FARTHER when it is about physical distance. Ex: He climbed farther up the hill. It is farther than I expected. We use FURTHER when it is about symbolic distance. Ex: They need to conduct further research. She didn’t want … Continue reading Farther vs Further

GET vs TAKE

English learners sometimes get confused about the usage of these two verbs because it's not always easy to decide which one to use. Therefore, we need to be very careful when we use them. We can say that take means to hold or pick something, while get has meanings: obtain, reach, arrive. Besides, both verbs … Continue reading GET vs TAKE

Usage of the word FAR

FAR is usually used in questions and negative sentences: London isn’t far from Coventry. Is your job far from your house? However, in affirmative sentences people usually say “a long way”: Los Angeles is a long way from New York. FAR is used in affirmative sentences only when it appears in phrases such as: too … Continue reading Usage of the word FAR

Across vs Over vs Through

ACROSS  and OVER are both prepositions and adverbs. They are in most cases interchangeable. Look at these sentences: They had to go across the river to get to their house. We walked over the bridge in the misty morning. However, when the meaning is ‘from side to side’, ACROSS is preferred: I ran across the … Continue reading Across vs Over vs Through

Any Longer vs Any More vs No Longer

Any longer and any more (or anymore) are synonyms. Unlike any longer and any more, no longer is used in positive sentences because it makes the sentence negative.

Especially and Specially

 Especially and specially are adverbs. Especially means more than usual, most of all, in particular. Judith likes chocolate, especially the dark one. I like tea, especially green tea. He’s usually tired in the evening, but he was especially tired this evening. Specially is used to talk about particular purpose or way of something. This dress … Continue reading Especially and Specially

Mistaken Words Like and As

There is a lot of confusion about these two words because they are similar in meaning. Here are some important differences between them:

Bring or Take?

The verbs bring and take are often mistaken because they both describe the movement from one location to another. The main difference is that bring describes movement toward someone or something: I’ll bring some tea. Pam brought a friend to the party. We should bring a camera to the picnic with us. On the other … Continue reading Bring or Take?

Good & Well

The main difference between good and well is: Good is an adjective and well is an adverb. Sarah paints well. Jim is a good painter. Things become confusing after linking verbs; we use good after linking verbs such as: be, taste, sound, smell, look, seem and feel if we want to describe the subject, not … Continue reading Good & Well